08 April 2013

On Thatcher

A few words in remembrance of Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013). For two summers between school and university I worked for the Conservative Party in London--at the constituency office level, at Conservative Central Office, and at Parliament for a Tory MP. I met her on several occasions in the last days of her reign. Always proper, always polite. Knowing my admiration, a girlfriend at the time who worked for an opposition politician gave to me as souvenirs several signed pieces of correspondence from her. At the time I very much appreciated the economic logic of Thatcherism. My views in those days were conservative-libertarian, pro-free market. And yet, I had doubts. I failed to understand exactly how on a societal and cultural level City 'barrow boys' were an improvement over Durham miners or Lancashire farmers. The Thatcher revolution, as it was called, struck me as a deeply American project, and, as such, alien to England. Even more crucially, I began to sense that ignoring the biological and demographic realities of the struggle ultimately would doom the conservative movement both in England and the US. A decade later my instincts were proved right when I once again settled in London and saw a city transformed by what can only be described as ethnic cleansing and race-replacement, i.e. genocide, changes that propelled me to the hardcore Nationalist side. It has been heart-breaking. The Thatcherism of my youth I attribute to naïveté; I have no other excuse. But there was an element of conviction and enthusiasm for the fight amongst Tory true-believers that with a few exceptions is lacking today. For having been exposed to it I am grateful. Thatcher, for all her imperfections, was a genuine statesman. There is much more I can say about my time with the Conservatives--and I will later--but I am afraid it will come across to you as so much reminiscing, sexual bravado, and gossip. Years move on.

8 comments:

Cameron said...

I was hoping you'd write something. Thanks.

MGM said...

I can relate to the history and development of your own political views. I was very much an ardent libertarian, free-market doctrinaire. But gradually I came to realize that those around me with similar views were very much unlike me personally. They were plebian populists. No appreciation for elitism, social hierarchy, and culture and tradition. They wanted to elevate the lowest among us through the medium of unregulated markets. I began to abhor this philosophy and no longer associate myself with it. I have come to appreciate that I am an elitist, through and through.

atlantis said...

I really cannot understand what can be seen as good with twatcher, unless one doesn't have any understanding of Politics.

La Sombra Sofisticada said...

Well written LBF.

Ordnungssinn said...

Much like my early zealotry with the GOP and the Gipper, Pat Buchanan would jolt me to reality in my early teen years.

The Tory in-laws on the other hand...

Anonymous said...

She was amazing. --A force of nature to be reckoned with-- People will debate her political decisions for the rest of time. Right or wrong, she had a strong sense of presence which is a rare thing. She was also quite pretty.

atlantis said...

Neo-Cons they're still alive, no wonder this world is going south

Anonymous said...

England has the highest percentage of race mixing than any other country in Europe of America.