05 March 2011

God of War: Baron von Ungern-Sternberg

The White Russian general and pan-monarchist Baron Roman von Ungern-Sternberg (1885-1921), decorated veteran of the Russo-Japanese War and World War I. Descended from a Baltic German clan of knights and privateers, von Ungern-Sternberg fought with Semyonov's forces in the Russian Civil War. He led his Asian Cavalry Division into Mongolia where he drove out the Chinese republican forces and restored the Bogd Khan. His dream was to restore the Qing Dynasty and Romanov Dynasty to force an Asiatic Imperial alliance that would destroy Bolshevism and restore the traditional reverence for monarchy and religion. The XIII Dalai Lama declared him to be a Mahakala incarnation; the Bogd declared him a co-reincarnation of his own predecessor. Mongolians referred to him as the "God of War". He was the last Czarist Russian general to be captured and executed.

9 comments:

Main Line Sportsman said...

Clearly his is a fascinating story. Any Biography of him floating around?

Dante said...

"The Bloody White Baron" James Palmer.

Main Line Sportsman said...

Thanks...

Anonymous said...

Of interest?

"Chapayev and Void", known in the US as "Buddha's Little Finger" and in the UK as "Clay Machine Gun", is a novel by Victor Pelevin--Baron von Ungern-Sternberg is a character in in it, depicted as the sovereign of esoteric spiritual "Inner Mongolia".

Anonymous said...

Beasts, Men and Gods, by Ferdinand Ossendowski (1922)

Baron Ungern von Sternberg – der letzte Kriegsgott (2007)

The History of Baron Ungern: An Experience of Reconstruction, by Sergei Kuzmin (2011)

Corto Maltese in Siberia, by Hugo Pratt (1974)

Stockton Andrews II said...

The Baron can also be found in Hugo Pratt's Corto Maltese stories.

One critic has said of the Baron: "...he has become a twisted sort of icon of pan-monarchist right-wing sentiment."

Of course, if someone called me a twisted right-wing pan-monarchist I'd say Thank You.

Stockton Andrews II said...

Sorry, missed the last Anonymous comment. Beat me to the Corto punch.

Davis said...

Check You Tube for a couple of films about him. He was quite a character. I first encountered him in Corto Maltese.

Lutetia Dandy Club said...

For the french readers:
"Ungern le baron fou" Jean Mabire (1973),
and a second edition:
"Ungern, le Dieu de la guerre", Jean Mabire (1987).

Ossendowski's book is wonderfull, reminds me of the movie "Derzu Uzala" (Akira Kurosawa).